Plain Aviation

the life of a planespotter and true avgeek

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5 tips for Airliners.net photo acceptance

Most beginning plane spotters and aviation photographers struggle to get their first photo accepted on to online aviation photography databases such as Airliners.net or JetPhotos.net. This is no surprise at all as these websites are very strict when it comes to image quality and reject the majority of images that pass through the screening and selection process. Therefore you shouldn’t feel discouraged when your first couple of uploads are rejected. It took me nearly a dozen attempts before I was able to get my first photo accepted on the Airliners.net. With some persistence and practice, eventually the right photo will come along. Here are my five tips to help you improve your aviation photography and increase your Airliners.net photo acceptance rate.

17 hurt on Hong Kong Airlines flight

Hong Kong Airlines – Photo by Christian Junker CC 2.0

On Friday the 6th of May, Hong Kong Airlines flight HX6704 from Denpasar Ngurah Rai International Airport (DPS) to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) carrying 204 passengers and 12 crew members encountered severe turbulence while flying over northern Indonesia, resulting in the injury of 17: 14 passengers and 3 crew members. The aircraft returned to Denpasar, and landed back in Denpasar two hours after diverting. Twelve people were rushed to the hospital, one with serious injuries. It was reported that some of the passengers were immediately flown to Hong Kong aboard a Garuda Indonesia flight, while others remained in Denpasar for the night.

Orient Thai penalized for flying with missing wheel

Recently, the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) laid out a series of punishments directed towards Bangkok-based Low Cost Carrier (LCC) Orient Thai for operating a flight into Nanning Wuxu airport with a wheel missing from the nose landing gear.

Cathay Pacific Airbus A350 launch delayed

Airbus A350 XWB – Photo by jmiguel rodriguez CC 2.0

Recently, to the disappointment of the Hong Kong spotting community, it was announced that the delivery of Cathay Pacific’s first Airbus A350 XWB would once again be delayed. Their first A350 (c/n 029) of the 46 that they have on order successfully completed its maiden flight at Airbus’ testing facility in April with test registration F-WZFX and is still waiting to be fitted with seats before it will be delivered to Cathay as B-LRA.

Both delays are due to issues with the manufacture of Cathay’s long-haul business class seats that will be installed on the aircraft. The majority of the blame lies on French manufacturer Zodiac Seats, who have been severely behind-schedule in their production and have been receiving plenty of (justified) criticism from Airbus and Boeing for delaying deliveries. Cathay Pacific is also guilty of making last-minute adjustments to the design of their business class seats that have complicated matters and slowed production.

FlyDubai crash: Pilot error to blame

The incident aircraft, a FlyDubai Boeing 737-800 (A6-FDN). Photo by Bruno Geiger CC 2.0

On the 18th of March this year, a FlyDubai Boeing 737-800 (registration A6-FDN) operating flight FZ981 with 55 passengers and 7 crew members crashed during landing phase at Rostov-on-Don airport in eastern Russia. The aircraft was initiating a go-around due to stormy conditions when it entered a dive and impacted the ground, instantly killing all on board. As the flight data recorders did not indicate any sort of mechanical failure and the weather was deemed not enough to be the sole cause of the crash, investigators speculated that pilot error was to blame for the crash.

Difference Between the Boeing 767 and 777

Condor Boeing 767-300ER. Photo by Oliver Holzbauer CC 2.0

Back in the day when I first started looking at planes I had the hardest time distinguishing between the Boeing 767 and 777 because they just looked so similar to me. When people try plane spotting for the first time, they typically have to rely on very concrete and noticeable features of each aircraft to distinguish them from others (for example the number of engines or doors present) before they are able get a feel for each aircraft and recognize them based off

Are airplanes getting smaller?

After decades of evolution in aircraft technology that have led the aviation industry from the Wright brothers’ first prototype aircraft to the Airbus A380, it’s hard to imagine that in recent years aircraft have actually been shrinking in size. Orders for the Airbus  A380 have been recently been dwindling; Boeing cut production of the 747-8 to only 6 frames per year; and the Boeing 747-400 is currently in the

Tips for dealing with police whilst spotting

 

A nasty confrontation with police is every spotter’s worst nightmare. This usually isn’t a problem for us spotters especially if we’re spotting from a designated location such as the airport observation deck. But with increasing levels of security at airports, such a confrontation is probably going to happen sooner or later, especially in areas of the world where the hobby is still developing and largely unrecognized. But here are

Jet fuel and aviation – all you need to know

Texaco Aviation Fuel Tanker – Photo by Flickr user Canadian Pacific CC 2.0

Have you ever stopped and wondered about the strange substance we call jet fuel that powers the airplanes you fly on? Perhaps you’re even curious about the nitty-gritty aspects of it, such as what is it made of, how much of it is carried on board every flight, where it is stored, and perhaps how much of it is burned every flight. Look no further, as I’m about to show you all there is to know about jet fuel.

1. What is jet fuel, and what is it made of?

Jet fuel is a specific type of fuel that has been designed to be

What is a trijet in airliner terms?

A private Boeing 727 trijet. Photo by Andrew W. Sieber CC 2.0

As you can probably tell already, the term trijet refers to any commercial jetliner with three engines. Normally they either have all three engines mounted aft of the cabin and near the tail as seen on the Boeing 727, or two mounted on the wings and the third mounted at the tail as seen on the McDonnell Douglas MD-11. One common feature of all trijets is that their third engine is always going to be embedded inside the vertical stabilizer to ensure symmetrical thrust output. While this feature increases the difficulty of design, production, and maintenance, the cost-savings of operating trijets over four-engined airliners is definitely worth it.

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